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Teaching your French bulldog puppy tips

| Care Tips, Frenchie Behaviors, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

French BulldogImage via Wikipedia

By the time you bring your new puppy home he will probably be around 8 to 10 weeks old and this is the perfect age to start teaching him. French bulldogs are known for their stubbornness so it is important that you start out as you mean to go on from the word go. Here are some of the most important things you should start teaching your new puppy straight away:

 

The routine

It is very important to teach your new puppy how life will be in his new home, puppies like to feel safe and have some kind of routine to their day and now is a good time to start. Some of the things you should teach him are:

* Where he will sleep.

* Where to find his food and water.

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What to look for in a puppy

| Buyers Guide, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

A ten-week-old female red merle Australian Shepherd puppy.Image via Wikipedia

Once you have decided on the breed of puppy you want and the sex of the puppy the next big question you should ask yourself is which puppy you should choose and what to look for when going to buy your puppy. Searching for information on the internet could have led to more confusion, so here are some helpful sensible hints to help you decide what to look for when you choose your new puppy:

Evaluate the litter

You should never feel rushed into making a decision and choosing a puppy, a reputable breeder will give you all the time you need when choosing your puppy, but don’t be swayed by their choice. While the breeder can give you good advice on caring for your new puppy and most will be honest, there are some who might try to sell you those puppies they don’t want to be stuck with, for example the boisterous dominating puppy, while most breeders wouldn’t dream of doing this there is the odd one which might be tempted.

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What to look for in a boarding kennel

| French Bulldog Facts, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

French BulldogImage via Wikipedia

However much we love our dog there may be times when it’s just not possible to be together and during this time we may need to place them into a boarding kennel. It will be hard leaving your dog especially if this is the first time and you’ll worry if they are going to be looked after well, will they miss you, and will they get taken for a walk or be comforted if there scared.

These are all natural feelings as your dog will be part of the family and you wouldn’t leave one of the members of your family with just anyone. The same applies to your dog with a little careful checking and looking around you can find a boarding kennel which can satisfy all your questions. Here are some tips when choosing a boarding kennel:

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Finding your lost dog tips

| Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

Swedish police dogs in action during nationalist demonstrations on National Day, 2007.Image via Wikipedia

Sometimes even with the best care in the world a dog or puppy can become lost or even worse stolen from the home, this will of course be a traumatic experience for the whole family particularly if your dog as been part of your family for many years. Here are some useful tips should the worse happen and you and your pet become separated:
Contact your local animal shelter or animal control agency

The first step you should take when you realise your dog is missing is to contact your local animal control agency and shelter. Provide them with a recent photograph and as much detail as you can regarding your dogs size, colour, weight, and sex, any special or distinctive markings and name of your dog.

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Buy French bulldogs tips

| Buyers Guide, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

Red fawn pied French Bulldogs. Paler versions are sometimes referred to as fawn pied, lemon pied or honey pied.Image via Wikipedia

* Make sure that you research the breed thoroughly before you buy a puppy or dog, never make an impulse purchase and buy the first puppy from the first breeder you find.

* Be honest with the breeder about what you’re looking for when you go to see the puppies or dogs, if you are looking for a show dog then don’t tell the breeder you want a pet because you think this will cost you less. A responsible breeder will sell their French bulldogs as pets with limited registration papers and you will not be able to show your dog without full papers.

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Top 10 essential dog caring tips

| Care Tips, Dog Training, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

maggie_girlImage by Bill in Ash Vegas via Flickr

Your dog is your companion who will give you many years of love, friendship and loyalty in exchange for loving care, safe shelter, clean water and decent food. They also rely on you to provide them with health care when they are ill and regular exercise and grooming to help keep them fit and healthy. Listed below are 10 essentials for keeping your dog fit and healthy for many years to come:

1. make sure that you give your dog a collar and that it includes an identity tag with your name and telephone number on it, or even better have an electronic tag fitted just under your dogs skin, this makes it easy to track your dog should it get lost or stolen.

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The French bulldog’s tail – how short?

| French Bulldog Facts, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

CarreraImage by Conson via Flickr

When you look back at some of the first ever French bulldogs you notice one thing straight away, the length of their tails. French bulldogs back then had much longer tails than the dogs of today, however there is no doubt that bulldogs selected for breeding did have the shortest tails or that tails were docked for one of the following reasons:

* As a way to avoid paying tax.

* To strengthen the back and increase the speed.

* To help prevent the tail being bitten while the dog was “ratting”.

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Preparing for your new puppy

| Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

This color and pattern are referred to as black masked fawn. The base color of the coat can vary in shade from red to tan. The mask refers to the marking pattern on the face.Image via Wikipedia

A new puppy will make a big change to your household until the puppy gets settled in and there may be many times you will wonder if having a puppy was such a good idea in the first place. The first few weeks will be the hardest until the new puppy gets used to his surroundings and his new family, so a little patience and perseverance will be what are needed from you at this stage. You can makes things run a little smoother by some planning before your puppy arrives in your home.

What you will need

* A plastic dog crate.

* Hard to destroy and easily washable bedding.

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Buying pet shop puppies

| Buyers Guide, French Bulldog Facts, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

A Great Pyrenees pup.Image via Wikipedia

Every pet shop that sells puppies will assure you that their puppies don’t come from puppy mills but only from the finest breeders who have surplus stock, this is often a downright lie and this is reason alone for you not to buy your puppy from a pet store.

A responsible reputable breeder would never sell their litters to a pet store in the first place, the simple reason for this is that a pet store must by law sell a puppy to anyone who walks in and can pay for the puppy, regardless of if that person can take care of a puppy. A pet shop by law isn’t allowed to screen buyers before selling them a puppy and a responsible breeder always screens potential buyers to assure their puppies only go to good homes.

The pet shop owners and staff are trained on how best to sell their wares and unfortunately this also includes live animals, selling is all that matters regardless of whether the person buying can look after a young puppy or not. Here are two of the lies you should be aware of.

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Dog spaying & neutering myths

| French Bulldog Facts, Frenchie Behaviors, Frenchie Owners menu | May 1, 2008

Photo of a dog behind a chain-link fence at the Paws and More No Kill Animal Shelter in Washington, Iowa. I took this picture. This looks just like my dog Yuma. He was from a shelter in Evanston Il.Image via Wikipedia

There are many myths surrounding spaying and neutering of your pet, here are a few of those myths dispelled:

* It costs too much to have my pet spayed or neutered

The cost of spaying or neutering your pet will depend on several factors such as the sex, age, size and vets fees, but the cost is a one time fee and when you take into account all the benefits it has to offer it is worthwhile. When you take into account the cost of having a litter and paying for its care until the puppies are old enough to leave their mother it really isn’t that expensive. You will also have peace of mind over the health of your pet and prevent unwanted pregnancy and litters.

* I don’t want my male dog to feel less of a male

Our pets don’t have the same ego or sense of sexuality that we humans do so neutering will not change your dog’s outlook this way, your dog wont suffer from any emotional distress due to this.

* My dogs a guard dog this will change after the operation Spaying or neutering your pet won’t affect their ability to be a guard dog in anyway, your dogs guarded and protection skills come from their built in genes not their sex hormones.

* My pet will get lazy and put on weight

Most pets that put on weight and get lazy do so because their owners feed them too much or give them the wrong diet to start with, this also stems from a lack of exercise and spaying or neutering doesn’t have an affect on the attitude or cause them to become lazy.

* Its better for the female dog if she has a litter

Medical evidence has shown us that a female dog that is spayed before her first heat is in fact the healthier dog, now many veterinarians are offering to sterilise kittens and puppies as young as eight weeks to help prevent unwanted litters later in life.

* My children should experience the miracle of birth

Allowing your dog to give birth just for the sake of the children is wrong in all aspects; besides the chances of your children actually being there when you dog give birth is very remote. Most dogs give birth in the very early hours of the morning and like privacy and seclusion while doing so, giving birth shouldn’t be a show which someone can watch and only a very irresponsible owner would even consider this.

* My dog is purebred it should be used for breeding

Unfortunately 1 in every 4 unwanted pets which are brought to animal shelters are in fact purebred, just because your dog is purebred doesn’t mean that it has to be bred, there are far too many unwanted animals for that to be the case and only an irresponsible owner would even consider breeding for this reason.

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